2x4basics 90192 Shed Kit, Peak Style Roof

June 14, 2013 - Comment

No Angle Cuts! You don’t have to be an expert carpenter to put together a well-built shed. Only straight, 90 degree cuts are required � no miters or complex measurements are needed to build your own shed with our patented connectors. You determine the size… Purchase one, two, or three kits to make your shed

No Angle Cuts! You don’t have to be an expert carpenter to put together a well-built shed. Only straight, 90 degree cuts are required � no miters or complex measurements are needed to build your own shed with our patented connectors. You determine the size… Purchase one, two, or three kits to make your shed up to 10 foot wide and 22 foot long (3048 mm x 6706 mm). We provide instructions for 7 x 8 foot (2134 mm x 2438 mm), 8 x 14 foot (2438 mm x 4267 mm) and 10 x 22 foot (3048 mm x 6706 mm). Easy plans are included: Materials lists, cut lists, and detailed instructions with step-by-step images are provided so that even beginning do-it-yourselfers can build a professional-looking shed. Our 2x4basics Shed Kit is cost effective and can save you 50% or more over other pre-built and knocked-down shed options. You supply the labor for this weekend project. Our galvanized steel connectors are designed for use with sturdy 2×4 (38 mm x 89 mm) framing, making your completed shed built to withstand the elements. You choose the roofing, siding, and flooring materials to suit your taste and budget. Check your local building codes for additional requirements or restrictions.

Product Features

  • Build your own custom shed in choice of 3 different sizes using our Shed Kit Connectors and your materials
  • Assembly is simple.
  • Connectors are made of strong 24 gauge galvanized steel
  • Includes 39 connector brackets plus materials needed list, lumber cut list and assembly instructions (enough to complete one 7 by 8 foot shed)
  • Purchase 2 kits to build an 8 by 14 foot shed and purchase 3 kits to build a 10 x 22 foot shed

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Comments

K. Sartain says:

It takes some skill and realistic expectations I would say more properly this is a shed “connection component” kit. All you get are the metal brackets and a rough plan. It’s up to you to supply the lumber and skill set to make the project work. That said, you’ll need some building experience like sawing wood, measuring and using a screw gun. And screwing the brackets to the wood is the way to go. Trying to nail it will only cause you frustration. Having someone to help is also a good idea. The frame is flimsy because this is not wood joinery used to make furniture. The sheathing plywood is what gives it strength very much like building a house. In fact if you have the basic skills to build a house you can make a shed like this without using the brackets. If you expect it to go together like a plastic shed you buy at the home center you’ll be disappointed. You’ll need the skill to frame a door and hang it with hinges and a latch of some sort. You’ll need to paint it and use some type of roofing material on it. When you’re done…

I think I'm Handy says:

Fun Project – Great Value I put my 7×8 shed together in about a weekend. You have to take your time and follow the instructions, but it’s all there. The framing was easy -and I saved a bunch. After purchasing the lumber, the whole shed cost me about $400. I’m very pleased with the quality and proud that I did it myself.

Maybe not as handy as the other guy says:

Some struggles but happy with the result High Level Info* We built the 7×8 version.* I’m a novice, but had help from my father who is more experienced.TimeWe had some foundation issues to work through before focusing on construction of the actual shed which took nearly a day due to concrete and mortar work. It was worth the effort to have a level foundation on which to build. After that, it took about 1 day to cut and frame, 1 day to put the roof boards and siding on and 1 day for shingling. So, all told, it took the two of us about 4 days to put up at a leisurely pace.CostWe bought some heavy tongue-and-groove particle board recommended for flooring, standard 2×4 studs, economy particle board for the roof and “Smartside” composite paneling for the walls, 25 year 3-tab shingles (3 squares but used about 2 1/2), tar paper, caulking, concrete blocks, concrete and mortar, mortar tool, aluminum trim for the roof, the screws and roof nails and the basics kit. I easily spent $600…

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