The Green House

June 30, 2013 - Comment

Mario Vargas Llosa’s classic early novel takes place in a Peruvian town, situated between desert and jungle, which is torn by boredom and lust. Don Anselmo, a stranger in a black coat, builds a brothel on the outskirts of the town while he charms its innocent people, setting in motion a chain reaction with extraordinary

Mario Vargas Llosa’s classic early novel takes place in a Peruvian town, situated between desert and jungle, which is torn by boredom and lust. Don Anselmo, a stranger in a black coat, builds a brothel on the outskirts of the town while he charms its innocent people, setting in motion a chain reaction with extraordinary consequences.

This brothel, called the Green House, brings together the innocent and the corrupt: Bonificia, a young Indian girl saved by the nuns only to become a prostitute; Father Garcia, struggling for the church; and four best friends drawn to both excitement and escape.

The conflicting forces that haunt the Green House evoke a world balanced between savagery and civilization — and one that is cursed by not being able to discern between the two.


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Comments

Guillermo Maynez says:

Intertwined stories This complex novel evolves during many years, through the memories and experiences of the characters, within the characteristic arbitrary timing of Vargas Llosa: flashbacks, voices from different ages speaking simultaneously, sudden jumps in time. The action takes place in two basic locations: the high and dry city of Piura, and the Amazonic region of Peru. There are several stories which interact and cross at several points: Fushia, the smuggler who dominates the Indians, whose story is told during his trip with the old Aquilino, down a river; the love story of Lalita and Nieves the soldier; the soldiers of Santa María of Nieva; Sargent Lituma and the Woman from the Jungle; Don Anselmo, the mythical founder of Piura’s nightlife, and thereafter a harp-player at brothels; The Unconquerables and the nuns from the convent.

Victor Gonzaga says:

Historia de un prostíbulo y de la deshumanización En “La Casa Verde” Mario Vargas Llosa va dando muestras de su progreso a un estilo totalitario que quedaría demostrado finalmente en “La Guerra del Fin del Mundo”. De allí en adelante el totalitarismo aparecería de manera desenfadada en todas las novelas que ha escrito hasta el momento.

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